Archive | Uncategorized RSS feed for this section

Google Europe Blog: Dear Rupert

26 Sep

Source: googlepolicyeurope.blogspot.co.uk

I am sometimes frustrated in the current policy debates because Google tends to not respond to accusations, even when said accusations are just plain stupid. So it’s fun and interesting to read Google’s response to Murdoch’s attacks in the last few days. Murdoch painting himself and his companies as Angels of content and information is hilarious enough, but even down to the specifics, this is worth reading. 

See on Scoop.itConnected World

Offshore Bandwidth Sparks Africa Fiber Boom | Light Reading

12 Sep

Africa is starting to see the knock-on effects of having greater international connectivity via multiple subsea cables.

Source: www.lightreading.com

In developed market, the broadband debate focuses access because for the most part, that’s the last remaining hurdle to better connectivity. In the developing world, as we highlighted in our white paper Connectivity Models for Developing Economies (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2343233) we highlighted by example how a solid and affordable backhaul would spark spontaneous access investment (at least in mobile). It’s great to see that in the case of Africa, it’s sparking wireline access investment as well. 

See on Scoop.itConnected World

Why Internet governance should be left to the engineers

4 Sep

It’s simple, keep the engineers in charge, not governments.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

If there’s one thing you have to read today it’s this. Larry Downes articulates the uneasy truths of the political side of the Net Neutrality debate much better than I could have, but I wholeheartedly agree with him. 

See on Scoop.itConnected World

The race for place (passive telecoms infrastructure) is over

11 Jul

Why telecom has been a land grab for exclusive telecoms infrastructure – and why this needs to change.

Source: richardmedcalf.com

I’m not sure that I fully agree about the degrading value of the last mile argument, but I really like the way Richard looks at it, especially in light of considerations on structural separation: an alternative to value going down is keeping the monoploly separated and regulated. A better (in my opinion) way to keep the investment going. 

NZ govt rejects Vodafone’s NBN offer

7 Mar

See on Scoop.itConnected World

UFB deployment to continue.

Benoit Felten‘s insight:

Sneaky but clever move from Vodafone. Good that the government held it’s ground: implementing structural separation to then let a vertically integrated player provide wholesale would have been a catastrophic move. 

See on www.itnews.com.au

Why Super-Fast Internet Is Coming Super Slowly

26 Feb

See on Scoop.itConnected World

In The Wall Street Journal, Andy Kessler writes that the FCC could change this overnight by focusing on what’s best for the economy, not just for those it regulates.

Benoit Felten‘s insight:

The underlying current of "it’s the cities’ fault" in this piece is one more reason every city in America (and many outside of America) should seriously ask themselves if taking their broadband future in their own hands isn’t the better option…

See on online.wsj.com

Consumer Study Teaser Summary

26 Feb

During the days preceeding the Sotckholm FTTH Council Annual Conference, we published a good number of tweets teasing some of the results of the first FTTH Consumer Survey. This study was undertaken in december with a panel of 400 users, 3/4 of which were FTTH/B users.

The full results were presented in Stockholm, and will be presented during a free-to-attend webinar sometime in April, but meanwhile I thought it might be interesting for those who haven’t read all the teasers to have them all in one place:

  • In Sweden a huge majority FTTH users (75%) think their broadband is better than before they had fiber.
  • 67% of Swedish broadband users think broadband over fiber is ‘Very Good’, but only 13% think the same of DSL.
  • Swedish FTTH subscribers use video-communication over the Internet five times as much (25%) as DSL users.
  • In Sweden the average FTTH user spends 5.3 hrs online at home, 6.7 hrs for <35 yrs old. DSL only 4.1 hrs.
  • In Sweden 59% of FTTH users see FTTH as modern. Only 17% of DSL users see DSL as modern.
  • In Sweden, 34% of FTTH users are 4Play or 3Play customers vs. only 23% for DSL users.
  • In Sweden 59% of FTTH users think fiber broadband is sustainable. Only 44% of DSL users think the same of DSL.
  • In Sweden, 59% of DSL users find their broadband price excessive vs. only 32% for FTTH users.
  • For FTTH users in Sweden, quality of broadband is the 1st criterion after home price when choosing a new home.
  • Close to half of Swedish FTTH users (45%) are Very Satisfied with their broadband vs. only 28% of DSL users.

FTTH Takes Online Gaming to the Next Level | Optical Reflection

25 Feb

See on Scoop.itConnected World

Benoit Felten‘s insight:

The next step is to convince policy makers that there is value in the gaming market. It’s bizarre how "entertainment" is a great market when it comes to touting your export achievements, but not so much when it comes to justifying investment in infrastructure…

See on opticalreflection.com

Google Reportedly Moving Towards Delivering 10Gbps Download Speeds With Google Fiber | Droid Life

14 Feb

See on Scoop.itConnected World

Benoit Felten‘s insight:

There are two ways to read this. One is to dismiss it entirely as yet more vaporware (lord knows there’s been a fair amount of that around Google Fiber). The other is to conclude that Google deployed P2P (unlikely) or is looking into WDM-PON (more likely). Either way, does it really change the name of the game ?

See on www.droid-life.com

ETB Launches FTTH With ZTE | Light Reading

11 Feb

See on Scoop.itConnected World

ZTE helps ETB launch FTTH broadband network in Colombia.

Benoit Felten‘s insight:

ZTE seems to be cruising nicely in Latin America. It’s about the only market apart from China where I truly see their successes, but in that market at least they have some significant wins starting with Uruguay’s Antel.

See on www.lightreading.com